Saturday, 17 December 2011

Android Community

Android Community


Android Community App of the Week: Craigslist HD for Tablets

Posted: 16 Dec 2011 10:27 PM PST

Welcome to Android Community’s App of the Week, where we highlight an outstanding app that you should know about, but probably don’t. There were a lot of solid new apps this week, and of course the conclusion of Google’s 10 Billion Apps promotion. But one app that I’ve been relying on heavily for a while and which deserves your attention is Craigslist HD for Tablets. If you’ve got a Honeycomb tablet and a nearby Craigslist hub, you owe it to yourself to check this one out.

Many of us use Craigslist as our proffered second-hand market, job fair, housing service and (ahem) more. But even the most fervent of Craigslist users would have to admit that the web version is sparse, if not ugly. Craigslist HD for Tablets takes the simple for sale, job, personal and housing listings and presents them in a beautiful Honeycomb-friendly tabbed format. The clean look of Craigslist is preserved, while updating the interface to compliment modern mobile UIs. While of course it’s not as fast as zipping through the web site with a mouse and keyboard, it’s much, much faster and easier than navigating via a mobile browser.

All the standard functions of Craigslist are present for the supported sections, including the all-important advanced search. Craigslist HD actually handles photos much better than its web counterpart, presenting them in a nearly full-screen gallery to take advantage of your tablet’s resolution. On listings with full photos or extensive HTML, the viewer pane gets a little cramped, but I haven’t seen any major issues so far. The home screen keeps track of listings you’ve replied to and your recently viewed items, and you can save, share or reply to the seller right in the app. Every listing has a link to the web version, just in case.

Developer Justin Burnette seems quite dedicated to keeping the app in tip-top condition – in fact, the latest release was just yesterday. And like Craigslist itself, Craigslist HD for Tablets is free. If you’re even a casual browser of Craigslist, download it in the Android Market now. Unlike that $20 unlocked DROID RAZR purchase from Honest Harry, you won’t be disappointed.

SC20111216-235757 SC20111216-235814 SC20111216-235823 SC20111216-235945 SC20111217-000034 SC20111217-000513 )


Motorola XOOM graced with Android 4.0.3 build

Posted: 16 Dec 2011 09:39 PM PST

We just saw Android 4.0.2 officially roll out to the Samsung Galaxy Nexus today, and even confirmed what would be in the Android 4.0.3 update to come. Well it seems the latest AOSP build has been pushed and supports the Nexus S and Motorola XOOM [WiFi]. Even better, the guys at XDA Developers have a bootable version of the ROM up and running for the XOOM.


Many features such as the camera are still broken, and there are a load of bugs that will need to be fixed – but that’s normal when taking an AOSP source. This is more of an extremely early Beta (or more appropriately an Alpha) of ICS for the Motorola XOOM, but their developmental community is strong, and this push should offer a great start. Of course, Motorola will eventually update the XOOM themselves; even if development starts to slow down.

From the clip you can see the obvious glitches when transitioning from screen to screen, but it’s extremely smooth. Even debatably smoother than the XOOM’s initial Honeycomb release. It’s great not having one universal OS to rule them all, and I have a feeling the developers are going to love it.

[via The Verge]

)


Dear Google: Android deserves a Nexus Certification Program

Posted: 16 Dec 2011 08:00 PM PST

If Verizon’s ridiculous handling of the Galaxy Nexus US launch has taught us anything, it’s that the carriers are still firmly in control of the mobile world, at least in the United States. While there’s no confirmation, strong evidence indicates that Verizon’s desire for a carrier-controlled NFC payment system, which isn’t even anywhere near launching, caused weeks and weeks of delays. Consumers in Google’s own country stewed while seemingly everyone else in the world got a hold of the very first Android 4.0 hardware. All we could do was cry foul until the release, something that a few of Google’s top brass must have been doing as well.

Add that to the Verizon’s continuous stance on locked bootloaders for flagship phones like the DROID RAZR and various carriers booting out apps form the Android Market seemingly at will, and the world’s most widely-used “open” mobile platform is looking more and more like a vector for wireless providers to hawk their secondary and tertiary services to customers without any real options.

So here’s my humble suggestion for fixing this glaring black eye on the Android ecosystem: cut out the middle man, create a set of standards and start selling devices to customers instead of corporations.

The Problem

As Android has exploded in market share over the last year and a half, so too have the frustrating modifications and restrictions that wireless carriers (and, to be fair, phone manufacturers) have placed on devices that are “owned” by their customers. The excitement over the Galaxy Nexus wasn’t just for Ice Cream Sandwich, or even for high-end hardware – after a few contract cycles of locked-down phones, mostly worthless UI additions and absolutely ridiculous wait times for over-the-air software upgrades, even mainstream consumers are beginning to see the value in a phone that’s controlled by Google, not the carriers. Thanks to Verizon’s heavy-handed influence on the Galaxy Nexus, as seen in a pair of bloatware apps and the absence of Google Wallet, the pure Android experience associated with the previous two phones is being severely tainted.

Google, here’s a sentiment straight from the end-users to you: one Nexus phone a year is not enough. Neither is one form factor, because not everyone wants a slate phone with a gigantic screen and no keyboard. If you want to continue to market Android as the future of mobile computing, you need to take back some of the control you wielded in 2008 and 2009. Begin demanding that carriers and manufacturers make “clean” Android available to consumers, free of any carrier or manufacturer additions.

And if they won’t do it, then Google, you need to.

The Program

The Nexus models are the most sought after phones by die-hard Android users, not because they’ve got the best hardware or the most features, but because we know they’ll always have the latest and greatest Android software. So why stop at one phone a year? Android is now mature enough that home developers can build a working OS from source on generic hardware in a single day. There’s nothing stopping manufacturers from putting a clean version of Ice Cream Sandwich on any hardware released in the last three months. And if the bile-filled messages aimed at Verizon on Twitter and Facebook from the last few weeks are any indiction, that’s what an increasing number of people want.

So give it to them. Instead of working with one company for months and creating a standard model, let any manufacturer submit any hardware for the Nexus label. Stipulate that they deliver hardware that runs the latest version of Android, free of any bloatware or modifications, and open for anything that users want to do (including custom ROMs and even other operating systems). Then let them use the Nexus name and send out the software updates from Google HQ. Yes, it’ll take more manpower, but it’s not like Google has any sort of cash problem… and keeping Android users happy with the platform is worth the investment.

And here’s the kicker: start selling Nexus hardware from Google again. The original Nexus One was sold directly from Google, and while it wasn’t any kind of a smash hit, the market is ripe for a top-down experience now. Verizon is even using SIM cards at this point, and a stipulation of the Block C spectrum purchase says they have to let customers use their own FCC-compliant hardware if they want. Google, please, sell us phones and tablets directly, and I guarantee there will be an uproarious response from users. We’re tired of seeing the latest and greatest devices come out only to have some crippling software bug from meddling manufacturers and carriers, then waiting months for  half-hearted fix.

As Nexus phones start to become the gold standard for all Android users, from the technorati obsessed with a ginormous Super AMOLED screen to the soccer mom who only wants a quick and easy way to run apps, carriers would have to play ball in the Nexus court. After that you can start selling Nexus phones and tablets with contracts and discounts, like any retailer.

The Process

Phones and tablets submitted to the “Nexus Certified” program would need to meet three basic guidelines. One, absolutely nothing but Android’s latest core software, plus Google’s branded suite of apps. No manufacture UIs, no features disabled, no carrier crapware. Yes, that includes an account manager, and nothing can be off-limits – I’m looking at you, Google Wallet. Two, all Nexus phones and tablets have to be completely open to the user. That doesn’t mean they come rooted or unlocked, but no effort to block advanced users from installing modified software should be present. That includes locked bootloaders. Advanced users, this carries some responsibility for you as well; kiss your warranty goodbye the moment you root. Mods and custom ROMs come with risks that the manufacturer/carrier shouldn’t have to bear. Three, all Nexus devices must be offered free of the carrier sales channel. Carriers could also sell the phones using the standard subsidy model, but if it’s only available for purchase through a carrier, it’s not a Nexus phone.

Even if Google doesn’t get any takers – a real possibility, as even minor league manufacturers like LG seem intent on souring Android with changes purely for the sake of differentiation – they’ve got an ace in the hole. Google just happens to have a brand new hardware subsidiary in Motorola Mobility, and it’d be a real disservice if every Motorola device made after the acquisition didn’t run pure Android. (If you just really love MotoBlur, or whatever they’re calling it this week, feel free to prove me wrong in the comments.) The original XOOM tablet was a good start, now make pure, updated Android the standard for the entire company.

Google wants to make phones and tablets that rock. The original carrier-free Nexus One, the WiFi tethering feature in Android 2.2 (always either dropped or bogarted for an extra fee by carriers), and the app disabling features in Ice Cream Sandwich prove that. And Google, we want to use them, but all too often we’re stymied by a group of companies that are so entrenched and focused, customer experience is absolutely the last thing on their minds.

Building out a new wireless system in the US, one that actually encourages openness and user freedom, is practically impossible… at least for the moment. So don’t. Just do what you do best in the mobile space: make great software that works with everything. Then reward manufacturers, and eventually even carriers, who do the right thing by giving them the most desirable label in the Android world. Give us Nexus devices that are as diverse as Android is now, in features, form factor and price, and you’ll see people flock to use Android like it’s meant to be used.

)


Verizon Galaxy Nexus: Significant signal issues arise

Posted: 16 Dec 2011 07:28 PM PST

Many of us, including myself, have been waiting months for the Samsung Galaxy Nexus to finally hit the US. And now that it finally has on Verizon Wireless, my experience has been less than perfect. The signal has continued to drop since purchase, and my previous 4G phone on Big Red had great signal strength.


When the signal doesn’t drop – it just hangs in 3G and an “Airplane Mode” toggle is required to get 4G back up and running. But here’s the catch, the signal was excellent for the 4 hours I used it before installing the 4.0.2 update. I thought it may have just been my device or even area, but many others are experiencing these issues over in a thread at XDA Developers.

Now one user, mastibeta, spent time on the phone with Verizon tech support and they seemed to not only fix the 4G lock on his device, but also double his data speeds. Lets hope it’s a software issue and not hardware; the Nexus S 4G had its share of signal issues and hopefully the Galaxy Nexus doesn’t follow suit. All of us here at Android Community using Verizon’s Galaxy Nexus are having similar signal problems – so we know there is an issue at hand.

Are any of you having signal issues? If so, please let us know in the comments below.

)


Motorola DROID XYBOARD 10.1 Review

Posted: 16 Dec 2011 05:37 PM PST

The Motorola DROID XYBOARD, known outside the world of baffling product marketing as the XOOM 2, has a lot riding on it. When the XOOM debuted on Verizon back in February, it was the only game in town as far as Honeycomb tablets were concerned. Now consumers have a choice of dozens of tablets, with or without wireless service, across a wide variety of form factors and prices. Can the updated Motorola tablet stand above the madding crows of 10-inch Android competitors?

Hardware

The original XOOM was no slouch when it came to hardware, but the Tegra 2 device has only seen a slight upgrade to its core components here. The processor gets a bump to a dual-core 1.2Ghz chip, using the same 1GB RAM. The same 1280 x 800 LCD is in place, though that’s definitely not a put-down, and the rear camera is 5 megapixels. But the most striking difference between the two models is the updated design.

The DROID XYBOARD 10.1 shared the ubiquitous DROID label, but not without good reason. The new tablet feels like a Motorola DROID product, solid, heavy, and suprisingly slim for its functionality. A rubberized border isn’t exactly a head-turner, but it makes the tablet much easier to hold on to, especially in a single hand. It’s a comfy tablet, and while it’s nowhere near as light as the Galaxy Tab 10.1, it feels like it could take a beating in a jacket or backpack without needing any kind of case. The power and volume buttons have been move to the back. They’re right where your right index finger can easily reach them, but thanks to a slighly sloping part of the back panel, they’re much less likely to get an accidental tap than the standard side-mounted buttons. It’s a nice touch, though I understand that not everyone is a fan. Try one out at retail before making your judgement here.

There is one area that the XYBOARD falls short of its predecessor: the MicroSD card slot is absent, replaced by 16, 32 or 64GB of on-board storage. (The original XOOM was initially released with a non-functional slot, then upgraded later.) On the bottom of the tablet you’ll find a standard MicroUSB port for charging and syncing – a big plus in my mind, as all too many Honeycomb tablets require proprietary cables for that function. A mini HDMI port is there as well. On top you’ve got an infrared port, a la the Vizio tablet and the Galaxy Tab 7.0 Plus, that the built-in Dijit app uses for controlling your home theater.

An active stylus is included in the package, powered by a tiny AAAA battery. While this is a nice addition, especially if you plan on using some of the included note-taking apps, it doesn’t offer much more than a slightly smaller and more precise pointing function. It doesn’t really hold up to the alternatives like the HTC Flyer, though that stylus costs exta. It’s nice to have around, but odds are you’ll be stashing it in a desk before long.

Software

With Verizon branding the new tablet as “the first 4G LTE tablet worthy of the name DROID”, you would expect a lot of carrier apps and bloatware. And yes, they’re present, just after the super-sized DROID eye finishes its maniacal stare. But in yet another pleasant surprise, nearly every single non-standard app can be uninsulated from the get go. This is a much appreciated choice, and you’ve got to hand it to Verizon for the decision. There’s a few stragglers like MotoCast, but for the most part you can get to a nearly clean Honeycomb 3.2 experience, albeit with a lot of customized icons.

Honeycomb itself runs quickly on the XYBOARD with no complaints are far as slowdown or stuttering is concerned. The tablet scores between 2700 and 2900 on a Quadrant Advanced benchmark – very nice. Playing the included Madden NFL 2012 confirmed that the tablet’s no slouch when it comes to gaming, but it likely won’t look like much once quad-core Tegra 3 tablets start arriving en masse.

The addition of an IR port is one I’m quite fond of, though the Dijit app leaves a lot to be desired. It controlled my Vizio TV just fine, but balked on my rather standard DirecTV DVR, even with dozens of built-in profiles. And it couldn’t learn the codes from my standard remote, a trick that programs on the old Palm Pilots were pulling ten years ago. On the plus side, the guide was easy to set up and navigate. If all your home theater equipment is supported it’s a fun way to do some couch surfing. Otherwise, don’t throw away your regular remote just yet.

Battery and media

The 5 megapixel camera is better than most tablet cameras. Granted, that’s not saying a lot, but it’s a considerable improvement over the original XOOM’s shooter. Photos and videos are crisp and clear, so long as you have decent light. The XYBOARD doesn’t outclass 8 megapixel tablets like the Transformer Prime or HTC Jetstream, but it’s more than adequate for quick shots at a party or on a road trip. But bring along a charger, because I managed just under six hours while using 3G data exclusively. I don’t live in a Verizon LTE area, but you can expect the battery life to be significantly less if you enable the greater speed. The flame that burns twice as bright burns half as long.

Value

And here we come to the one real sour note of the XOOM 2 DROID XYBOARD 10.1: the price. With a starting price tag of $529 for the 16GB version, all the way up to $729 for the 64GB version, it’s no cheap piece of tech. That would be just about bearable, if it weren’t for the fact that you’re also saddled with a 2-year Verizon contract. There’s no other way to put it: that’s way too expensive, and way too much of a commitment, for something that’s essentially a media consumption device. It’s not as bad as AT&T’s baffling price on the HTC Jetstream, but it’s still a lot more than I’d ever shell out. The smaller 8.2-inch version is $100 cheaper at each storage level, but still a hard price to pay when WiFi tablets are cheaper and free of continuing expense.

Wrap Up

I was surprised at just how solid the hardware and software of the DROID XYBOARD 10.1 turned out to be. But for the lackluster battery life, it’s a worthy successor to the first Honeycomb device. But the simple fact is that it’s too expensive to recommend over its competitors. Those wanting high-end power should wait for the Transformer Prime, those wanting always-on data should check out the cheaper options at T-Mobile. The only device that the XYBOARD really beats on all fronts is the 9-month old Galaxy Tab 10.1 at the same price. Verizon, AT&T et all: my kingdom for an Android tablet that follows the iPad’s lead (for wireless pricing, anyway) and doesn’t force me to sign another contract!

IMG_1564 IMG_1569 IMG_1571 IMG_1576 IMG_1582 IMG_1597 P1170532 P1170538-540x327 P1170542-540x376 P1170543-540x184 P1170549 P1170560
Device Specifications and Information
Device Info
    Device Name : DROID XYBOARD 10.1
    Manufactuer : Motorola
    Carrier : Verizon
    Announced Date : November 03, 2011
    Release Date : December 09, 2011
    Also Known As : XOOM 2
Display
  • Screen Size : 10.1 Inch
  • Resolution : 1280x720
  • Screen Type : LCD
Dimension & Weight
  • Height : 10 Inch
  • Width : 6.83 Inch
  • Depth : 0.35 Inch
  • Weight : 599 Grams
Battery & Power
    Battery Type:
  • Lithium Ion
  • Battery Capacity : mAh
  • Talk Time : NA
  • Stand By Time : NA
Software
    Android OS:
  • 3.2.x
    Audio Playback:
  • AAC
  • AAC+
  • MP3
  • WMA
    Video Playback:
  • MPEG-4 (MP4)
Hardware
    CPU :
    CPU Clock Speed : 1200 Mhz
    Core : 2
    Ram : 1024 MB
    Internal Storage : 16 GB
    Front Facing Camera :
    Camera Resolution :5 MP
    External Storage:
  • MicroSD
  • MicroSDHC
    Camera Features:
  • Auto focus
  • Flash
    Sensors:
  • Accelerometer
  • Ambient light
    QWERTY :
Cellular Network
Device Connectivity
    Wi-Fi:
  • 802.11b
  • 802.11g
  • 802.11n
    Bluetooth:
  • Bluetooth 2.0
    Location Features:
  • Compass
  • GPS
    FM Radio :
    NFC :

)


Motorola DROID XYBOARD 8.2 Review

Posted: 16 Dec 2011 05:33 PM PST

Earlier this year Motorola’s first tablet the XOOM launched as the first Honeycomb tablet and had plenty of promise. Sadly the hefty size and bloated Verizon 3G data pricing didn’t help its cause. We now have the next-gen Xoom happily named the DROID XYBOARD tablets to see what they learned from their first attempt at a tablet. The XYBOARD has been hanging out with our team and a few Galaxy Nexus smartphones this week and below you’ll find our thoughts on this 8.2″ Honeycomb device.

We have an unboxing video and some hands-on with a few accessories from Motorola below but for now we’ll focus on this portable slate, its goofy name, and the hardware under the hood.

Hardware
The original Xoom was the first Honeycomb tablet and first with a dual-core NVIDIA processor — not counting that awful FroYo powered Viewsonic G-Tablet. The hardware was nice but compared to the iPad it was a bit on the heavy/thicker side and wasn’t the easiest to hold for long periods. The DROID XYBOARDS have completely took a new direction. They are thin, lightweight, and powerful but other than those key points this is still a XOOM if you ask me.

The new XYBOARD 8.2 feels great, has an eye-pleasing matte finish that is surprisingly easy to hold coming in at 216 x 139.8 x 8.99 mm and 390g — although it wont win any beauty contests. Sadly the power button is still on the rear. I hate flipping it over to make sure I hit the right button — or guessing and hitting the volume instead. Sadly this is one thing I’d really like to change but the sleek design didn’t make it extremely easy.

The specs are pretty similar but a few things have changed. Here we have an 8.2″ device with the same 1280 x 800 HD resolution. The processor has been swapped out to a faster dual-core 1.2 GHz SOC with 1GB of RAM, 32GB internal storage, 4G LTE, and a pair of cameras. The display is IPS and is a vast improvement over the first-gen XOOM so that is a plus. We have no SD slot but it does offer micro-USB (for charging) and I’m glad there isn’t a proprietary cable for that. It also sports an infrared port and can be used as a large universal remote when your not streaming content out the micro-HDMI.

Sadly it seems Motorola and Verizon rushed to market with these to meet this holiday sales time and this tablet is right on the edge of two important things. A quad-core processor and Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich. For someone that needs an excellent tablet with 4G connectivity right now though — this is great but its reign wont last long.

DROID XYBOARD 8.2 hands-on and unboxing

Software
The software is everything we’ve come to expect from Android 3.2 Honeycomb. Most tablets I’ve docked points if they have Gingerbread and while it’s too early to do the same with tablets and Ice Cream Sandwich, I just wish they’d have waited and released with the ice cold treat on board instead. What we do have though, is a larger DROID as Motorola has included their Blur UI changes that are present on all DROID phones. The changes to Honeycomb were extremely light and more to just match their other devices because it’s pretty minimal and performance is still excellent.

Being a DROID branded device it does have plenty of Verizon bloatware but you should be expecting that so I wont comment further there. We do have some worthwhile apps pre-loaded like Evernote and the awesome Madden 2012 NFL game. Not to mention Blockbuster, Amazon Kindle, and Netflix. Android 3.2 Honeycomb was more stable and smooth here than many in the past — including the original Xoom and the benchmarks below seem to back that up. I found zero slowdown from the changes by Motorola so that shouldn’t concern a potential buyer.

Benchmarks
As usual we like to run a few benchmarks to see how everything is performing and handling its day to day tasks and the XYBOARD 8.2 actually blew other tablets out of the water — not counting that quad-core Prime although we did get a higher Quadrant with this little guy. Rocking a 1.2 GHz dual-core processor and a 1280 x 800 resolution I wasn’t expecting much but I scored over 3100 in Quadrant (more than most tablets) and Vellamo was at the top of the charts. More info is in the full gallery below.

Camera
Motorola’s equipped these slates with a decent 5.0 megapixel camera on the rear with LED flash. Sadly just like many Motorola devices in the past while the UI is neat the shutter speed is extra slow and makes for a difficult time snapping a photo. Once I was able to hold still long enough for the awful autofocus and shutter speed I got a few decent shots. I’d rather use my smartphones camera but this will do if absolutely needed. Here’s a sample with more down below.

Battery Life
The XYBOARD 8.2″ is powered by a 3,980 mAh battery and is small enough that can be charged by a simple micro-USB cable. Charging from a computer or phone charger was extremely slow but the included charger did the job well. Using the tablet for some heavy Madden 2012 gaming followed by some benchmarks I found the need for a wall socket after around 6 hours which was pretty decent for the battery size. Other larger tablets pack a bigger punch so this seemed about average to me. Standby battery was excellent however — and using it off and on briefly without and major gaming sessions it’s been on for over 3 days with a single charge.

Accessories
Verizon and Motorola are offering a smart cover similar to the iPad 2 but the design was quite terrible and I couldn’t get it to work well enough to even warrant a photo. They do however offer an HD Dock for $59.99 from Verizon.com that works quite well and is universal to other Motorola devices — shown in the video sample below along with the wireless keyboard.

Wrap-Up & Value
Now value is determined more by the user and his/her needs. If you’d like a great WiFi tablet this is not for you. If you’re needing a 3G/4G capable tablet that also manages to be extremely portable and powerful this would probably be my first choice. With tethering and hotspots I’d rather get a cheaper WiFi model myself but that option isn’t available for everyone. Pricing start at $429.99 for the 16GB 8.2-inch version, all the way up to $729.99 for the 64GB 10.1-inch version — all with new 2-year contracts of course. They may be released as the XOOM 2 later with Wi-Fi only but for now Verizon is your only way into one of these tablets and sadly they are way too expensive.

Yes the new XYBOARD tablets are worthy successors to the original. They have amazing build quality, decent battery life and excellent performance but I can’t help it but want something more for the price. The unique design is nice and they do get a few added points for that. All in all I’ve enjoyed this tablet and been taking it everywhere with me all week but the price and handcuffs that come along with it have me thinking twice about a purchase. Everything you’d like to know about these tablets is available from our timeline, followed by the photo gallery and full specs below.

P1080260-1 P1080261 XY Blur P1080240-1 P1080241-1 P1080242 P1080248 P1080293 P1080297 P1080298 P1080299 P1080301 P1080302 P1080304 P1080306 P1080307 IMG_20111216_162530 IMG_20111216_162609 IMG_20111216_162714 XY Quad best XY Speed more XY speed XY Vell main
Device Specifications and Information
Device Info
    Device Name : DROID XYBOARD 8.2
    Manufactuer : Motorola
    Carrier : Verizon
    Announced Date : November 03, 2011
    Release Date : December 09, 2011
    Also Known As : XOOM 2 ME
Display
  • Screen Size : 8.2 Inch
  • Resolution : 1280x720
  • Screen Type : NA
Dimension & Weight
  • Height : 8.5 Inch
  • Width : 5.47 Inch
  • Depth : 0.35 Inch
  • Weight : 386 Grams
Battery & Power
  • Battery Capacity : mAh
  • Talk Time : NA
  • Stand By Time : NA
Software
    Android OS:
  • 3.2.x
    Audio Playback:
  • AAC
  • AAC+
  • AMR
  • MP3
  • WMA
    Video Playback:
  • h.264 / AVC
  • MPEG-4 (MP4)
Hardware
    CPU :
    CPU Clock Speed : 1200 Mhz
    Core : 2
    Ram : 1024 MB
    Internal Storage : 16 GB
    Front Facing Camera :
    Camera Resolution :5 MP
    Camera Features:
  • Auto focus
  • Flash
    Sensors:
  • Accelerometer
  • Ambient light
    QWERTY :
Cellular Network
Device Connectivity
    Wi-Fi:
  • 802.11b
  • 802.11g
  • 802.11n
    Bluetooth:
  • Bluetooth 2.0
    Location Features:
  • Compass
  • GPS
    FM Radio :
    NFC :

)


GSM / HSPA+ Galaxy Nexus gets Android 4.0.2 today

Posted: 16 Dec 2011 02:28 PM PST

If you picked up a Verizon Galaxy Nexus yesterday, you probably got an over the air update to Android Ice Cream Sandwich 4.0.2 almost immediately. Today the GSM model joins the party, though there’s still not a lot of information available as to what it changes. Google’s official stance is that it’s for various bug fixes – they must have been small enough to escape the notice of reviewers, importers and international Android aficionados.

The update file is less than 10 megabytes, and installs in about five minutes. If you’ve already rooted your phone and installed a custom recovery image (like a good little Android modder) the phone will download the update, but fail to install it. You can either go back into the bootloader and flash the standard recovery from Google’s official Galaxy Nexus GSM image, or wait for someone to make a ZIP package that’s flashable via ClockworkMod. Seeing as it’s not a critical update, I’d wait for the latter, unless you can’t stand the pop-up messages from the update.

Elsewhere in the world of Nexus, Nexus S users are now the first to get an official upgrade to Ice Cream Sandwich. The update is rolling out to Nexus S GSM owners right now. Manufacturers are hot on the trail, with Asus already showing off an ICS update for the upcoming Transformer Prime and Samsung’s TouchWiz-flavored version of Ice Cream Sandwich leaked for the Galaxy S II. And of course, dozens and dozens of devices are getting Ice Cream Sandwich by way of custom ROMs. Google has an even newer version of Ice Cream Sandwich, 4.0.3, is in the works.

Device Specifications and Information
Device Info
    Device Name : GALAXY Nexus
    Manufactuer : Samsung
    Carrier : Verizon
    Announced Date : October 18, 2011
    Release Date : December 15, 2011
    Also Known As : Nexus Prime
Display
  • Screen Size : 4.65 Inch
  • Resolution : 1280x720
  • Screen Type : Super AMOLED
Dimension & Weight
  • Height : 5.33 Inch
  • Width : 2.67 Inch
  • Depth : 0.35 Inch
  • Weight : 135 Grams
Battery & Power
    Battery Type:
  • Lithium Ion
  • Battery Capacity : 1750 mAh
  • Talk Time : NA
  • Stand By Time : NA
Software
    Android OS:
  • 4.0.x
    Audio Playback:
  • AAC
  • AAC+
  • AMR
  • MID
  • MP3
  • WAV
  • WMA
    Video Playback:
  • h.263
  • h.264 / AVC
  • MPEG-4 (MP4)
    Messaging:
  • SMS
  • MMS
Hardware
    CPU : OMAP 4460
    CPU Clock Speed : 1200 Mhz
    Core : 2
    Ram : 1000 MB
    Internal Storage : 32 GB
    Front Facing Camera :
    Camera Resolution :5 MP
    Camera Features:
  • Auto focus
  • Flash
  • 1080p Video Recording
    Sensors:
  • Accelerometer
  • Ambient light
  • Proximity
    QWERTY :
Cellular Network
    Network Technology:
  • GSM
  • CDMA
    GSM Band:
  • 850
  • 900
  • 1800
  • 1900
Device Connectivity
    Wi-Fi:
  • 802.11b
  • 802.11g
  • 802.11n
    Bluetooth:
  • Bluetooth 3.0
    Location Features:
  • Compass
  • GPS
  • Cellular location
  • Wi-Fi location
    FM Radio :
    NFC :

[via Android Central]

)


Samsung Nexus S Android 4.0 update officially rolling out today

Posted: 16 Dec 2011 01:34 PM PST

We heard a rumor about this last week that never went very far but today it’s officially official. Google has started the update to Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich for the Google Samsung Nexus S. We are assuming this will be Android 4.0.3 that was detailed earlier today — This was confirmed by Google over on Twitter this afternoon.

A few weeks ago a couple Google employee’s received the OTA update and were commenting on Google+ but those were all quickly removed. It looks like the testing phase has been completed as Google themselves have confirmed to be started today and rolling out over the next few weeks.

Google has also put together a neat set of tips for those moving from Gingerbread to Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich. The update should start hitting both the T-Mobile and the non GSM versions of the Nexus S soon. I’m sure it will be plastered on XDA any minute now so be sure and start checking your favorite developer forums. I’d be hitting menu > settings > about phone > check for updates right about now. Enjoy that Ice Cream Sandwich and feel free to look over our ICS hands-on and more below from the Timeline.

Device Specifications and Information
Device Info
    Device Name : Nexus S
    Manufactuer : Samsung
    Carrier : T-Mobile
    Announced Date : December 07, 2010
    Release Date : December 16, 2010
    Also Known As :
Display
  • Screen Size : 4.00 Inch
  • Resolution : 480x800
  • Screen Type : Super AMOLED
Dimension & Weight
  • Height : 4.88 Inch
  • Width : 2.48 Inch
  • Depth : 0.43 Inch
  • Weight : 129 Grams
Battery & Power
    Battery Type:
  • Lithium Ion
  • Battery Capacity : 1500 mAh
  • Talk Time : NA
  • Stand By Time : 713 hours
Software
    Android OS:
  • 2.3.x
    Audio Playback:
  • AAC
  • AAC+
  • AMR
  • MP3
    Video Playback:
  • h.263
  • h.264 / AVC
  • MPEG-4 (MP4)
    Messaging:
  • SMS
  • MMS
Hardware
    CPU : Cortex A8 Hummingbird
    CPU Clock Speed : 1000 Mhz
    Core : 1
    Ram : 512 MB
    Internal Storage : 16.384 GB
    Front Facing Camera :
    Camera Resolution :5 MP
    Camera Features:
  • Auto focus
  • Flash
    Sensors:
  • Accelerometer
  • Ambient light
  • Proximity
    QWERTY :
Cellular Network
    Network Technology:
  • GSM
    GSM Band:
  • 850
  • 900
  • 1800
  • 1900
Device Connectivity
    Wi-Fi:
  • 802.11b
  • 802.11g
  • 802.11n
    Bluetooth:
  • Bluetooth 2.0
    Location Features:
  • Compass
  • GPS
  • Cellular location
  • Wi-Fi location
    FM Radio :
    NFC :

)


No comments:

Post a Comment